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July 2016
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Beachwood Buzz
31
Real Alloy, a Global Aluminum Recycling Business, has
Opened Its New Global Headquarters
on Park East Drive in Beachwood
On October 17, 2014, the
Beachwood-based Aleris
Corporation announced that it
had reached an agreement to
sell its recycling-related assets
to Real Industry, Inc. of Sher-
man Oaks, California. The sale
became final on February 27,
2015. The result of this transac-
tion was the formation of a new
company Real Alloy, Inc. Soon
after the spinoff was complete,
Real Alloy actively began a site
search for its new global head-
quarters. The search included
looking at locations outside
of Beachwood and Northeast
Ohio.
"We are pleased that we
found office space in Beach-
wood that met all our require-
ments to continue our growth
strategy," said Terry Hogan,
president of Real Alloy. "We
are very grateful to the efforts
of the City of Beachwood for
working with us to craft an
incentive package that made
economic sense and allowed
us to continue to be competi-
tive. By staying in Beachwood,
we had minimum disruptions
to our operations and to our
current employees. This un-
derscores our commitment to
Beachwood, our local employ-
ees and the Northeast Ohio
region."
Real Alloy is the global
leader in third-party aluminum
recycling with over 1,700 em-
ployees worldwide, 24 plants in
North America and Europe, and
sales in 2015 of approximately
$1.4 billion. The new global HQ
is currently home to 77, includ-
ing 45 existing jobs that were
spun out of the Aleris sale and
32 new, full-time positions.
Mayor Merle S. Gorden said
that when he was approached
by the Real Alloy manage-
ment team, "the City quickly
engaged with the company's
management team to find pos-
sible locations and to craft an
incentive package that would
be appealing to the company,
while also making economic
sense for the city." Last year, the
incentive package was passed
by City Council and presented
to Real Alloy. The incentives
included a one-time occu-
pancy grant along with both
job-retention and job-creation
incentives.
Gorden said that supporting
the retention and expansion
of existing companies is a core
development strategy that is
central to Beachwood's contin-
ued growth.
"An international company
that has Beachwood roots has
made a reinvestment in our
City and our region, and we
celebrate that," Mayor Gorden
said. "We are thrilled with their
long-term commitment and
wish them much continued
success.
The attraction of new com-
panies, and the jobs that they
bring with them, are always a
priority for the Beachwood Eco-
nomic Development team."
In recognition of Real Alloy's
choosing Beachwood for its
new global headquarters,
Mayor Merle S. Gorden and City
Council proclaimed Tuesday,
May 10, 2016, as "Real Alloy
Day" in the City of Beachwood,
and extended a warm welcome
to all new employees.
A Message of Independence
When I left for college, my mom sent me with a book, What Smart
Women Know, by Steven Carter and Julia Sokol. I have read it and
recommended it more times than I can count. The book's message
is one of empowerment, having realistic expectations, self-respect
and independence. I have read this book throughout the various
stages of my life when going to college, falling in love, after several
years of marriage and now as a mother of teenage boys. The book's
message is timeless AND genderless.
Here are a few of my favorite excerpts:
A smart person knows that their most valuable sense is a sense of self.
A smart person knows they are not being smart when:
They think having a bad relationship is better than being alone.
They need another to validate their sense of worthi-
ness.
A good person has a realistic lifestyle and realistic
goals; and is attracted to those who reflect his or her
values and interests, wants an equal partner, is not
manipulative, IS supportive without being controlling,
knows how to share responsibilities, is honest, has
reasonable boundaries, is capable of commitment
and wants what's best for both of you.
Although the book focuses on romantic
relationships, this information can be applied to
friendships and business relationships as well.
Remember that we are all human with unique personalities, so we
will not always agree. Differences are a part of life, not immediate
grounds for breaking up, cutting people off or quitting. Conflicts
have to be discussed and negotiated, and both parties have to be
prepared to compromise.
What Smart Women Know is written as though your favorite aunt
has just sat you down to talk some sense into you. It is insightful,
accessible and funny. It encourages us to rely on logic and self-aware-
ness when assessing the health of our relationships as well as our re-
lationships' goals. A healthy relationship should be one in which you
feel the space to grow as a healthy, strong and independent person
while supporting, respecting and enjoying each other.
* For purposes of this article, the word woman was replaced with
person to convey a gender-neutral message.
Jennifer Stern, LISW, is a Loss and Bereavement Specialist at Ellen
F. Casper, PH.D and Associates in Beachwood. For more information,
she can be reached at 216.464.4243.
What Smart Women Know is written as though your
favorite aunt has just sat you down to talk some sense
into you. It is insightful, accessible and funny.